Revive Your Pipes and install an internal epoxy barrier coating in your pressure pipes

  1. The piping system is reviewed and the system configuration analyzed and measured.
  2. The entire piping system is drained.
  3. Compressed air is blown through the pipe to fully dry it.
  4. An abrading agent is introduced into the air stream and the turbulence of the abrading agent carrying air scours the interior of the piping system, removing tuberculation and scale buildup.
  5. A patented epoxy is introduced into the air stream and the turbulence of the air moves the epoxy through the pipe and fully coats the interior pipe walls.
  6. Compressed air is blown through the pipe until the epoxy cures and hardens.

Process Explained [Video]

By manipulating the air flow in the main piping system and branch lines, a complex piping system consisting of numerous branches with ninety (90) degree bends, horizontal & vertical pipes and changes in pipe size can be lined with a contiguous barrier coating. A wide variety of pipe materials can be coated with this process including galvanized steel, ductile iron, cast iron, copper & PVC plastic.

The blown-in epoxy barrier coating process has a long history in North America, dating back to the early 1980’s when the US Navy developed the process to coat the pipes in their aircraft carriers that were experiencing failures due to corrosion after only a short time at sea. The Navy performed extensive research and testing on the process, advancing blown-in coating to the well accepted process that it is today.

Surface preparation and control of the process parameters are critical in ensuring that a well bonded barrier coating is applied to the interior of the piping system.

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Revive Your Pipes and install an internal epoxy barrier coating in your pressure pipes


  1. The piping system is reviewed and the system configuration analyzed and measured.
  2. The entire piping system is drained.
  3. Compressed air is blown through the pipe to fully dry it.
  4. An abrading agent is introduced into the air stream and the turbulence of the abrading agent carrying air scours the interior of the piping system, removing tuberculation and scale buildup.
  5. A patented epoxy is introduced into the air stream and the turbulence of the air moves the epoxy through the pipe and fully coats the interior pipe walls.
  6. Compressed air is blown through the pipe until the epoxy cures and hardens.

Process Explained [Video]

By manipulating the air flow in the main piping system and branch lines, a complex piping system consisting of numerous branches with ninety (90) degree bends, horizontal & vertical pipes and changes in pipe size can be lined with a contiguous barrier coating. A wide variety of pipe materials can be coated with this process including galvanized steel, ductile iron, cast iron, copper & PVC plastic.

The blown-in epoxy barrier coating process has a long history in North America, dating back to the early 1980’s when the US Navy developed the process to coat the pipes in their aircraft carriers that were experiencing failures due to corrosion after only a short time at sea. The Navy performed extensive research and testing on the process, advancing blown-in coating to the well accepted process that it is today.

Surface preparation and control of the process parameters are critical in ensuring that a well bonded barrier coating is applied to the interior of the piping system.

Email this page